Archive for the ‘P.G. Wodehouse’ Category

Jeeves in the Morning by P.G. Wodehouse (Audio Book)

October 2, 2008

From AudioFile
Here are the zany misadventures of foggy-minded aristocrat Bertie Wooster and his sharp-witted valet, Jeeves. They visit Steeple Bumpleigh, home of Bertie’s Uncle Percy, also the home of Bertie’s ex-fiancée, Florence, and her new fiancé, Constable Stilton Cheesewright. In addition, Bertie’s cousin, Nobby, wants Bertie’s help in gaining Uncle Percy’s approval of her writer fiancé. To complicate the romantic antics, Stilton thinks Bertie wants to reconcile with Florence (as does Florence) and threatens bodily harm. Into the muddle comes Jeeves, who, as always, saves the day. It’s hard to improve on this treasure, but Jonathan Cecil does it with an impeccable, wildly funny narration. M.T.B.

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The Inimitable Jeeves by P.G. Wodehouse (Audio Book)

October 2, 2008

Since his first appearance in print in 1919, Jeeves has become synonymous with British tongue-in-cheek humor. Valet to bumbling aristocrat Bertie Wooster, Jeeves is continually helping his employer out of scrapes. In this debut novel, Wooster’s lovesick pal Bingo Little decides to marry and enlists his friend’s help. Luckily for Wooster, Jeeves comes to the rescue.

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The Code of the Woosters: Jeeves to the Rescue by P.G. Wodehouse (Audio Book)

October 2, 2008

This 1938 novel is off to a rollicking start when Aunt Dahlia demands that Bertie Wooster help her dupe an antique dealer into selling her an 18th-century cow-creamer. Dahlia trumps Bertie’s objections by threatening to sever his standing invitation to her house for lunch, an unthinkable prospect given Bertie’s devotion to the cooking of her chef, Anatole. A web of complications grows as Bertie’s pal Gussie Fink-Nottle asks for counseling in the matter of his impending marriage to Madeline Bassett. It seems Madeline isn’t his only interest; Gussie also wants to study the effects of a full moon on the love life of newts. Added to the cast of eccentrics are Roderick Spode, leader of a fascist organization called the Saviors of Britain, who also wants that cow-creamer, and an unusual man of the cloth known as Rev. H. P. “Stinker” Pinker. As usual, butler Jeeves becomes a focal point for all the plots and ploys of these characters, and in the end only his cleverness can rescue Bertie from being arrested, lynched, and engaged by mistake!

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Thank You, Jeeves (A Jeeves and Bertie Novel) by P.G. Wodehouse (Audio Book)

October 2, 2008

“Poor” Bertie finds he just can’t live without Jeeves, which we knew all along didn’t we? Don’t forget to bow now, Jeeves.

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Stiff Upper Lip Jeeves (Bertie Wooster & Jeeves) by P.G. Wodehouse (Audio Book)

October 2, 2008

From AudioFile
Is it possible? Jonathan Cecil gets even better at reading Wodehouse. Given the excellence of his earlier narrations, that’s hard to believe, but it’s true. In this Wodehouse classic, Cecil gets a chance to stroll through a half-dozen distinct class and regional accents of British English. Everyone–except the ever-calm Jeeves, of course–writhes in sublimely ridiculous emotional agonies as Madeline tries to convert Gussie Finknottle into–say it softly–a vegetarian, thereby upsetting the applecart of relationships for everyone from narrator Bertie to dog Bartholomew. Completely ridiculous, it’s all a pleasure for the ear and wit. G.T.B.

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Jeeves and the Mating Season by P.G. Wodehouse (Audio Book)

October 2, 2008

From Publishers Weekly
Wodehouse and Cecil are a terrific pair. Cecil’s narration is marvelous, as he perfectly evokes the character of Wodehouse’s Bertie Wooster: good-natured, educated, articulate, but often befuddled as he finds himself drawn into harebrained schemes. Fortunately, he can rely on the sensible advice of his butler, Jeeves, to “pull him out of the soup,” as Bertie would say. Cecil’s lively performance highlights the humor of Wodehouse’s words, and he creates distinctive voices for each character, which is an admirable accomplishment, considering nearly all of them are upper-crust British men. He is also faithful to directions in the text. Whether it’s depressed Catsmeat saying “hello” in a “hollow voice that sounded as if it came from the tomb,” or Madeline simpering in her “syrupy” voice, Cecil’s narration is on target. The comical story is pure Wodehouse. In an attempt to help various pals with their romantic difficulties, Bertie finds himself at Deverill Hall pretending to be insipid acquaintance Gussie; frantically sneaks into Madeline’s house to snatch an incriminating telegram before she reads it; and faces the dire prospect of reciting Winnie the Pooh poems to a rough-and-tumble audience at a village concert. Of course, with Jeeves’s sage council, all is put right in the end, and four loving couples are reunited, while the relieved Bertie remains happily unattached.

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